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Your Rights- Due Process

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If the government wants to take land to build a highway, the Fifth Amendment says that the affected property owners must

be compensated for the land.

be imprisoned if they object.

defend their land rights in court.

surrender the land as part of their patriotic duty.

be compensated for the land.

Evidence collected during an illegal search cannot be used in court based on the

exclusionary rule

Why was the Fourth Amendment added to the Constitution?

to keep the government from abusing its authority

to prove to citizens that the government would be tough on criminals

to enable the government to find ways to assert its authority

to show leniency to people who are accused of crimes

to keep the government from abusing its authority

The Supreme Court’s decisions in Terry v. Ohio (1967) and Horton v. California (1990) both held that the police

may, in certain cases, search individuals or seize their property without a warrant.

must never, even with reasonable cause, carry out a stop and frisk.

must always have a warrant to seize evidence, even if it is in plain view.

may never violate the Fourth Amendment protections concerning searches and seizures.

may, in certain cases, search individuals or seize their property without a warrant.

In addition to protection against self-incrimination, the Fifth Amendment ensures that people have

double jeopardy and grand jury rights.

search and seizure and grand jury rights.

Miranda warning and probable cause rights.

just compensation and warrant rights.

double jeopardy and grand jury rights.

If people in court say, "I plead the Fifth," that means they

are probably guilty on all counts.

do not want to be forced to testify against themselves.

want to ask the judge to issue a warrant.

have been denied due process.

do not want to be forced to testify against themselves.

Which is a grand jury right?

the right to the same treatment and rules that all citizens receive

the right to avoid confessing to a crime

the right to indictment before trial for a capital crime

the right to avoid being tried twice for the same crime

the right to indictment before trial for a capital crime

The Fourth Amendment to the Constitution protects citizens’

search and seizure rights.

In Duckworth v. Eagan (1988), the Supreme Court held that the police

had been too harshly burdened by the Miranda decision and no longer had to follow it.

could create their own Miranda warning if it communicated the same message.

did not need to read the Miranda warning if they considered a suspect to be dangerous.

could create any warning they chose so long as they got a conviction.

could create their own Miranda warning if it communicated the same message.

In Miranda v. Arizona (1966), why did Ernesto Miranda say his Fifth Amendment rights had been violated?

He had been stopped and searched without a judge issuing a proper warrant.

He had been tried for serious crimes without a grand jury issuing an indictment.

He had confessed to crimes without being reminded of his right to avoid self-incrimination.

He had been jailed without being informed of the charges against him.

He had confessed to crimes without being reminded of his right to avoid self-incrimination.

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