PSY 456 EXAM 2 CH 9

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1. (p. 343) Bereavement is defined as the
A. objective event of loss.
B. reaction to loss.
C. loss of a loved one.
D. customary display of grief.

A. objective event of loss.

2. (p. 344) The emotional reaction and responses of anguish, anger, or relief to the death of a loved one are collectively termed
A. grief.
B. mourning.
C. bereavement.
D. shock.

A. grief.

3. (p. 344) In addition to insomnia and changes in appetite, physical disturbance that occurs with grief typically includes
A. anxiety.
B. tightness of the throat.
C. sense of disorganization.
D. confusion and forgetfulness.

B. tightness of the throat.

5. (p. 344) What is our "assumptive world?"
A. Our circle of family, friends and community
B. The world we expect to be stable and reliable
C. Our world created after experiencing a loss D. Religious or spiritual beliefs

B. The world we expect to be stable and reliable

6. (p. 345) In contrast to the reaction to loss, what is the PROCESS by which a bereaved person integrates a loss into his or her ongoing life?
A. Grief
B. Mourning
C. Bereavement
D. Closure

B. Mourning

7. (p. 345) Wearing a black armband traditionally signifies A. a conventional mourning behavior.
B. a degree of emotional hardness.
C. a protest against a political action.
D. an adherence to a certain policy.

A. a conventional mourning behavior.

8. (p. 345) What is a way of signifying mourning among some Native Americans?
A. Fasting for 36 hours
B. Cutting one’s ceremonial headdress feathers
C. Burying the deceased’s moccasins
D. Cutting one’s own hair short

D. Cutting one’s own hair short

9. (p. 345) A theme common to mourning behaviors cross-culturally is that the bereaved
A. are different and this difference diminishes with time.
B. are more likely now to engage in formal customs than in the past.
C. are usually very sure about what constitutes appropriate mourning behavior and ritual.
D. do not alter their appearance until the first anniversary of the death.

A. are different and this difference diminishes with time.

10. (p. 346) Whose model focuses on four tasks of mourning, including accepting the reality of the loss, processing the pain of grief, and finding an enduring connection with the deceased?
A. Wass
B. Parkes
C. Silverman
D. Worden

D. Worden

11. (p. 346) The concept of adjusting to a world without the deceased is associated with
A. J. William Worden’s tasks of mourning.
B. DABDA.
C. George Engel’s investigation of stressful situations.
D. narrative approaches to coping with loss.

A. J. William Worden’s tasks of mourning.

12. (p. 347) Who is known for the paper "Mourning and Melancholia?"
A. Worden
B. Lindemann
C. Freud
D. Bowlby

C. Freud

13. (p. 347) Attachments and the processes by which we relinquish them were central concerns in the work of
A. Therese Rando.
B. J. William Worden.
C. John Bowlby.
D. Dennis Klass.

C. John Bowlby.

14. (p. 348) The grief-work model has been widely accepted as the standard formulation for
A. acknowledging the necessity for a universal way of coping.
B. understanding and helping people accommodate to loss.
C. maintaining household shrines for ancestors.
D. recognizing, reacting, and readjusting to loss.

B. understanding and helping people accommodate to loss.

15. (p. 350) Lyn Lofland suggests that some of the "ties that bind" us to one another are the roles we play, the help we receive and the
A. wider network of others made available to us.
B. shared experiences like birth and death.
C. linking objects in our lives.
D. religious spiritual and mystical beliefs.

A. wider network of others made available to us.

16. (p. 350-351) Telling the "story" of grief can help in coping with loss in which of the following ways?

1. Sharing the story provides emotional relief and promotes the search for meaning.

2. The story can be told without the constraint of having to conform to a particular model of how it should be.

3. The story brings people together in support of one another.

4. Fantasizing about a different ending is very therapeutic and healing.

A. 2, 3, and 4
B. 1, 3, and 4
C. 1, 2, and 3
D. 1, 2, and 4

C. 1, 2, and 3

17. (p. 351) Sharing the story of a loss provides emotional relief, promotes the search for meaning, and
A. diminishes guilt.
B. brings people together in support of one another.
C. maintains a legacy.
D. allows for ongoing mourning after the funeral.

B. brings people together in support of one another.

18. (p. 351) In the dual-process model of coping, loss-oriented coping includes
A. looking at old photographs.
B. selling the house or moving to another area.
C. handling finances previously done by the deceased.
D. developing a new identity.

A. looking at old photographs.

19. (p. 351) What is an example of loss-oriented coping?
A. Reorganizing one’s life
B. Selling one’s home
C. Looking at old photographs
D. Paying bills

C. Looking at old photographs

20. (p. 351) According to the dual-process model of coping, what coping behavior includes mastering tasks that had been taken care of by the deceased and developing a new identity?
A. Loss-oriented
B. Restoration-oriented
C. Dynamic process
D. Biopsychosocial

B. Restoration-oriented

21. (p. 352) According to Simon Shimson Rubin’s Two-Track Model of Bereavement, which of the following considers quality of family relationships, health concerns, and investment in life tasks?
A. Track I: adjusting to a world without the deceased
B. Track II: internal working model
C. Track I: general biospychosocial functioning
D. Track II: posttraumatic stress and emotional difficulties

C. Track I: general biospychosocial functioning

22. (p. 356) Which of the following typically occurs during the initial period of grief?
A. Pining for the deceased
B. Sadness gradually recedes into the background
C. Sense of confusion and disorganization
D. Intense re-experiencing of the history of the relationship with the deceased

C. Sense of confusion and disorganization

23. (p. 357) Which of the following typically occurs during the middle period of grief?
A. Feelings of disorganization and disbelief
B. Feelings of denial and refusal to accept death
C. A sense of relief and mental balance
D. Sadness and longing

D. Sadness and longing

24. (p. 358) Anniversaries, birthdays, special occasions, and holidays
A. are usually happy times even in the midst of mourning.
B. can reawaken and reactivate unexpected feelings of grief.
C. do well to mark the time of a loved one’s absence.
D. have to be celebrated just as before the death.

B. can reawaken and reactivate unexpected feelings of grief.

25. (p. 359-360) According to Therese Rando, which of the following may especially complicate grief?

1. Death of a child.

2. Bereaved person’s perceived lack of social support.

3. Relationship between bereaved and deceased that was intimate and friendly.

4. Bereaved’s perception that the death was somehow preventable.

A. 1, 2, and 3

B. 1, 2, and 4

C. 1, 3, and 4

D. 2, 3, and 4

B. 1, 2, and 4

26. (p. 360) Complicated mourning is best described as
A. sorrow, sadness, relief, and anger.
B. recurrence of grief.
C. failure to realize the implications of a loss.
D. persistent problems with sleeplessness or loss of appetite.

C. failure to realize the implications of a loss.

27. (p. 360) According to Neimeyer, Prigerson, and Davies, What is the "inability to reconstruct a meaningful personal reality" after loss?
A. Complicated grief
B. The initial phase of grief
C. Bereavement burnout
D. Low-grief

A. Complicated grief

28. (p. 362-363) The idea that one can die of a "broken heart"
A. is a myth perpetuated by poets and songwriters.
B. has no scientific basis or rationale.
C. is being investigated scientifically and is considered plausible.
D. was a popular notion during the fifteenth century and is now discounted.

C. is being investigated scientifically and is considered plausible.

29. (p. 363) Which term best describes the phenomena of death as a consequence of the stress of bereavement?
A. Broken heart
B. Sudden death
C. Cause-and-effect
D. Unfinished business

A. Broken heart

30. (p. 364) According to Edgar Jackson, what factors are especially important in a survivor’s response to loss?
A. Personality, mode of death, and social roles
B. Mode of death, values, and relationship with the deceased
C. Personality, social roles, values, and perception of the deceased’s importance
D. Values, culture, and social roles

C. Personality, social roles, values, and perception of the deceased’s importance

31. (p. 368) In the instrumental (linear) pattern of grieving, how is grief experienced and expressed?
A. In an affective way
B. In art, literature, and song
C. In restlessness or mental activity
D. In oscillations between loss-oriented and restoration-oriented coping styles

C. In restlessness or mental activity

32. (p. 368) In the intuitive (systemic) pattern of grieving, individuals experience and express grief
A. physically.
B. through dreams and images.
C. via feelings and emotions.
D. by doing and problem solving.

C. via feelings and emotions.

33. (p. 368) When a person experiences grief physically, as restlessness or mental activity, Terry Martin and Kenneth Doka would identify this pattern of grieving as A. intuitive.
B. instrumental.
C. physical grief.
D. expressive grief.

B. instrumental.

34. (p. 369-370) Which of the following is generally considered a high-grief death?
A. The death of an elderly man in a care facility
B. The death of a middle-aged woman from cancer
C. The death of a teenager in a car accident
D. The death of a retired postal worker from heart disease

C. The death of a teenager in a car accident

35. (p. 370) Of the following modes of death, which is most likely to be characterized as a low-grief death?

A. Homicide of a teenager
B. Hit and run death of a child
C. Terminal illness of an elderly man
D. Suicide of a friend

C. Terminal illness of an elderly man

36. (p. 372) Factors that can restimulate grief for survivors of a homicide are termed
A. recurring events.
B. secondary events.
C. trigger events.
D. grief events.

C. trigger events.

37. (p. 373) In the wake of multiple losses, survivors may feel they have "run out of tears," resulting in bereavement
A. exhaustion.
B. burnout.
C. overload.
D. drain.

B. burnout.

38. (p. 374) Disenfranchised grief can be described as a
A. framework for dealing with loss.
B. consequence of lacking social support or acknowledgement of loss.
C. response to prior knowledge of an impending death.
D. situation that produces an intense emotional and physical reaction.

B. consequence of lacking social support or acknowledgement of loss.

39. (p. 374) Grief experienced in connection with a loss that is not socially supported or acknowledged through the usual rituals is
A. disenfranchised.
B. anticipatory.
C. complicated.
D. instrumental.

A. disenfranchised.

40. (p. 375) Unfinished business is best described as
A. addressing issues about the topic of death.
B. taking a lifelong dream vacation before death.
C. resolving conflicts between medical staff and patient.
D. issues or "business" that goes on after a death.

D. issues or "business" that goes on after a death.

41. (p. 376) Unfinished business is a term that can relate to the
A. plans and dreams that the bereaved had shared with the deceased.
B. financial aspects of funeral plans.
C. process that leads to probate.
D. need to act on the wishes of a will.

A. plans and dreams that the bereaved had shared with the deceased.

42. (p. 379) Which of the following is a helpful behavior when lending support to the bereaved?
A. Urging the bereaved person to be strong and brave
B. Simply listening without judgment
C. Encouraging the bereaved to achieve closure
D. Give advice on good self help books to read

B. Simply listening without judgment

43. (p. 380) Which of the following bereavement organizations focuses on supporting military families?
A. The Compassionate Friends
B. Bereaved Families of Ontario
C. Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors
D. Men in Blue Foundation

C. Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors

44. (p. 381) Which of the following statements best describes how bereavement is an opportunity for growth?
A. Energy that was bound to the past is freed up.
B. Stories and concerns can be shared.
C. The survivor expected the death.
D. The survivor has a positive model of the world.

A. Energy that was bound to the past is freed up.

45. (p. 344) A significant loss can cause us to question our fundamental assumptions about the world and our place in it.

TRUE

46. (p. 348) Colin Murray Parks points to three main influences on a person’s course of grieving and states that there is finally an established standard way of coping with loss.

FALSE

47. (p. 348) Margaret Stroebe points out that suppression or avoidance of confrontation with memories related to the deceased is risky and an ineffective strategy of coping.

FALSE

48. (p. 349) Maintaining bonds with the deceased is primarily an American phenomenon and would be surprising to people celebrating African traditions.

FALSE

49. (p. 352) As time passes, bereaved individuals rarely experience changes in their perspective on themselves and on the relational bond to the deceased.

FALSE

50. (p. 359) Individuals may experience a resurfacing of grief stimulated by a public death.

TRUE

51. (p. 361-362) The inclusion of bereavement as a diagnosis in the DSM-5 was a welcome change amongst most thanatologists, because of the clarification of terms, the medicalizing of grief and accessibility to antidepressant medications.

FALSE

52. (p. 362) The diagnosis of complicated grief is welcomed by psychologists as it clarifies symptoms and avoids medicalizing grief.

FALSE

53. (p. 362) During the twentieth century, grief was considered a legal cause of death that could be listed on a death certificate.

FALSE

54. (p. 363) Evidence suggests that the reaction to loss of a loved one may reduce the body’s ability to fight disease.

TRUE

55. (p. 369) With respect to grief, someone operating systemically will likely experience and express grief emotionally.

TRUE

56. (p. 372) "Trigger events" are caused by the use of a gun during a homicide or suicide.

FALSE

57. (p. 375) Resolving conflicts and problems with the dying person can facilitate the management of grief.

TRUE

58. (p. 376) Deathbed promises constitute a particular kind of unfinished business.

TRUE

59. (p. 377) Grief counseling on the Internet raises questions regarding the appropriateness and effectiveness of such services.

TRUE

60. (p. 378-379) With the vast amount of data and research on grief counseling and grief therapy, it appears both are widely accepted and proven to have positive outcomes for psychological distress.

FALSE

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