Comparing and Contrasting Two Versions of The War of the Worlds (Quiz)

Read the passage.

The crowded diner was bustling with the lunch rush.The parties assembled in the booths huddled over laminated menus, discussing specials and office gossip. As Manny sipped his coffee, something in the doorway caught his eye. Others noticed, too, and soon the din of conversation ceased. The figure hesitated, backlit by the noon sun, holding the door wide. Some people still did not register his arrival. But soon his towering frame caused every diner's chin to tip up in his appraisal, and a collective gasp resounded.

Which descriptive details does the author include to entertain readers? Check all that apply.

- "crowded diner was bustling" - "backlit by the noon sun" - "a collective gasp resounded"

Read the passage.

UFOs, or unidentified flying objects, are often the topic of science fiction novels. In reality, UFOs are often aircraft, kites, clouds, or meteors that observers are unable to recognize at first glance. A UFO near Roswell, New Mexico, made headlines in the mid-twentieth century and remains a pop-culture phenomenon. In more modern history, satellite launches have caused rocket debris that is often observed and reported as a UFO.

What is the purpose of this passage?

A. to inform readers about the term "UFO" wrong B. to entertain readers with a story of a UFO landing C. to inform readers about government record-keeping D. to persuade readers to report UFOs to authorities

Read the passage.

No science fiction anthology is complete without an excerpt from The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. It has every element of great science fiction: suspense, intrigue, and Martians. The story is a timeless classic. It captivated readers nearly one hundred years ago, and it is still relevant and spellbinding.

What is the purpose of this passage?

D. to persuade readers of the literary merit of The War of the Worlds

How do authors impart aesthetic elements? Check all that apply.

- through their word choice - through their tone - through the story's mood

Which statement best explains the aesthetic elements of a literary work?

wrong A. Aesthetic elements establish background. B. Aesthetic elements distinguish characters. C. Aesthetic elements impart an artistic quality. D. Aesthetic elements offer a thematic message.

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds:

"Henderson," he called, "you saw that shooting star last night?"

"Well?" said Henderson.

"It's out on Horsell Common now."

"Good Lord!" said Henderson. "Fallen meteorite! That's good."

"But it's something more than a meteorite. It's a cylinder—an artificial cylinder, man! And there's something inside."

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch's script for Orson Welles's radio adaptation:

WILMUTH: I seen a kinda greenish streak and then zingo! Somethin' smacked the ground. Knocked me clear out of my chair!

PHILLIPS: Well, were you frightened, Mrs. Wilmuth?

MRS. WILMUTH: Well, I—I ain't quite sure. I reckon I—I was kinda riled.

PHILLIPS: Thank you, Mr. Wilmuth. Thank you.

Which statement best describes the similarity between these versions?

A. Both versions cite expert testimony. wrong B. Both versions explain scientific terms. C. Both versions share the impressions of local residents. wrong D. Both versions show friendships developing during the crisis.

Which statement best describes the difference between the aesthetic appeal of the two versions of The War of the Worlds?

B. The written text relies on vivid description; the radio adaptation uses frenzied dialogue and sound effects.

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds:
Everything was then quite invisible, hidden by the deep pit and the heap of sand that the fall of the cylinder had made. Anyone coming along the road from Chobham or Woking would have been amazed at the sight—a dwindling multitude of perhaps a hundred people or more standing in a great irregular circle, in ditches, behind bushes, behind gates and hedges, saying little to one another and that in short, excited shouts, and staring, staring hard at a few heaps of sand.

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch's script for Orson Welles's radio adaptation:

PHILLIPS: Ladies and gentlemen, you've just heard Mr. Wilmuth, owner of the farm where this thing has fallen. I wish I could convey the atmosphere . . . the background of this . . . fantastic scene. Hundreds of cars are parked in a field in back of us. Police are trying to rope off the roadway leading to the farm. But it's no use. They're breaking right through. Cars' headlights throw an enormous spot on the pit where the object's half buried. Some of the more daring souls are now venturing near the edge. Their silhouettes stand out against the metal sheen.

(FAINT HUMMING SOUND)

One man wants to touch the thing . . . he's having an argument with a policeman. The policeman wins . . .

Which statements describe similarities in the authors' craft? Check all that apply.

- Both authors use descriptive adjectives. - Both authors impart an ominous mood. - Both authors cite scientific research. - Both authors offer social criticism. - Both authors use a concerned tone.

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds.

The peculiar V-shaped mouth with its pointed upper lip, the absence of brow ridges, the absence of a chin beneath the wedgelike lower lip, the incessant quivering of this mouth, the Gorgon groups of tentacles, the tumultuous breathing of the lungs in a strange atmosphere, the evident heaviness and painfulness of movement due to the greater gravitational energy of the earth—above all, the extraordinary intensity of the immense eyes—were at once vital, intense, inhuman, crippled and monstrous. There was something fungoid in the oily brown skin, something in the clumsy deliberation of the tedious movements unspeakably nasty.

Which statement best describes how Wells conveys his purpose with this excerpt?

A. He provides quotes from experts. wrong B. He shares data about the creature. C. He appeals to the reader's beliefs. D. He uses detailed physical description.

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds:

The common round the sand pits was dotted with people, standing like myself in a half-fascinated terror, staring at these creatures, or rather at the heaped gravel at the edge of the pit in which they lay. And then, with a renewed horror, I saw a round, black object bobbing up and down on the edge of the pit. It was the head of the shopman who had fallen in, but showing as a little black object against the hot western sun. Now he got his shoulder and knee up, and again he seemed to slip back until only his head was visible. Suddenly he vanished, and I could have fancied a faint shriek had reached me.

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch's script for Orson Welles's radio adaptation:

PHILLIPS: Ladies and gentlemen, you've just heard Mr. Wilmuth, owner of the farm where this thing has fallen. I wish I could convey the atmosphere . . . the background of this . . . fantastic scene. Hundreds of cars are parked in a field in back of us. Police are trying to rope off the roadway leading to the farm. But it's no use. They're breaking right through. Cars' headlights throw an enormous spot on the pit where the object's half buried. Some of the more daring souls are now venturing near the edge. Their silhouettes stand out against the metal sheen.

Which statement best describes the similarity between these versions?

wrong A. Both versions impart an urgent tone through a resident's words. B. Both versions impart setting details through colorful description. C. Both versions explain the background of a scientific phenomenon. D. Both versions use characterization to show the locals' intelligence.

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds.

But, looking, I presently saw something stirring within the shadow: greyish billowy movements, one above another, and then two luminous disks—like eyes. Then something resembling a little grey snake, about the thickness of a walking stick, coiled up out of the writhing middle, and wriggled in the air towards me—and then another.

How does the author create an aesthetic impact in the excerpt?

wrong A. through realistic dialogue wrong B. through a comforting tone wrong C. through scientific explanation D. through colorful description

Which excerpt from The War of the Worlds uses a vivid visual description for aesthetic impact?

C. "A lank tentacular appendage gripped the edge of the cylinder, another swayed in the air."

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds.

The end of the cylinder was being screwed out from within. Nearly two feet of shining screw projected. Somebody blundered against me, and I narrowly missed being pitched onto the top of the screw. I turned, and as I did so the screw must have come out, for the lid of the cylinder fell upon the gravel with a ringing concussion. I stuck my elbow into the person behind me, and turned my head towards the Thing again. For a moment that circular cavity seemed perfectly black. I had the sunset in my eyes.

How does the author create an aesthetic impact in the excerpt?

B. through the suspenseful mood

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds:

Then came the night of the first falling star. It was seen early in the morning, rushing over Winchester eastward, a line of flame high in the atmosphere. Hundreds must have seen it, and taken it for an ordinary falling star. Albin described it as leaving a greenish streak behind it that glowed for some seconds. Denning, our greatest authority on meteorites, stated that the height of its first appearance was about ninety or one hundred miles. It seemed to him that it fell to earth about one hundred miles east of him.

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch's script for Orson Welles's radio adaptation:

ANNOUNCER TWO: Ladies and gentlemen, we interrupt our program of dance music to bring you a special bulletin from the Intercontinental Radio News. At twenty minutes before eight, central time, Professor Farrell of the Mount Jennings Observatory, Chicago, Illinois, reports observing several explosions of incandescent gas, occurring at regular intervals on the planet Mars. The spectroscope indicates the gas to be hydrogen and moving towards the earth with enormous velocity.

Which statement best describes the difference between these versions?

wrong A. The radio adaptation's tone is more urgent than the novel's tone. wrong B. The radio adaptation's tone is more academic than the novel's tone. wrong C. The radio adaptation's tone is more peaceful than the novel's tone. wrong D. The radio adaptation's tone is more friendly than the novel's tone.

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells's The War of the Worlds.

There were raised voices, and some sort of struggle appeared to be going on about the pit. Strange imaginings passed through my mind. As I drew nearer I heard Stent's voice:

"Keep back! Keep back!"

A boy came running towards me.

"It's a-movin'," he said to me as he passed; "a-screwin' and a-screwin' out. I don't like it. I'm a-goin' 'ome, I am."

I went on to the crowd. There were really, I should think, two or three hundred people elbowing and jostling one another, the one or two ladies there being by no means the least active.

How does the author use tone to create an aesthetic impact in the excerpt?

wrong A. through vivid adjectives B. through tense dialogue wrong C. through expert testimony D. through background information

Comparing and Contrasting Two Versions of The War of the Worlds (Quiz) - Subjecto.com

Comparing and Contrasting Two Versions of The War of the Worlds (Quiz)

Your page rank:

Total word count: 1972
Pages: 7

Calculate the Price

- -
275 words
Looking for Expert Opinion?
Let us have a look at your work and suggest how to improve it!
Get a Consultant

Read the passage.

The crowded diner was bustling with the lunch rush.The parties assembled in the booths huddled over laminated menus, discussing specials and office gossip. As Manny sipped his coffee, something in the doorway caught his eye. Others noticed, too, and soon the din of conversation ceased. The figure hesitated, backlit by the noon sun, holding the door wide. Some people still did not register his arrival. But soon his towering frame caused every diner’s chin to tip up in his appraisal, and a collective gasp resounded.

Which descriptive details does the author include to entertain readers? Check all that apply.

– "crowded diner was bustling" – "backlit by the noon sun" – "a collective gasp resounded"

Read the passage.

UFOs, or unidentified flying objects, are often the topic of science fiction novels. In reality, UFOs are often aircraft, kites, clouds, or meteors that observers are unable to recognize at first glance. A UFO near Roswell, New Mexico, made headlines in the mid-twentieth century and remains a pop-culture phenomenon. In more modern history, satellite launches have caused rocket debris that is often observed and reported as a UFO.

What is the purpose of this passage?

A. to inform readers about the term "UFO" wrong B. to entertain readers with a story of a UFO landing C. to inform readers about government record-keeping D. to persuade readers to report UFOs to authorities

Read the passage.

No science fiction anthology is complete without an excerpt from The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells. It has every element of great science fiction: suspense, intrigue, and Martians. The story is a timeless classic. It captivated readers nearly one hundred years ago, and it is still relevant and spellbinding.

What is the purpose of this passage?

D. to persuade readers of the literary merit of The War of the Worlds

How do authors impart aesthetic elements? Check all that apply.

– through their word choice – through their tone – through the story’s mood

Which statement best explains the aesthetic elements of a literary work?

wrong A. Aesthetic elements establish background. B. Aesthetic elements distinguish characters. C. Aesthetic elements impart an artistic quality. D. Aesthetic elements offer a thematic message.

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells’s novel The War of the Worlds:

"Henderson," he called, "you saw that shooting star last night?"

"Well?" said Henderson.

"It’s out on Horsell Common now."

"Good Lord!" said Henderson. "Fallen meteorite! That’s good."

"But it’s something more than a meteorite. It’s a cylinder—an artificial cylinder, man! And there’s something inside."

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch’s script for Orson Welles’s radio adaptation:

WILMUTH: I seen a kinda greenish streak and then zingo! Somethin’ smacked the ground. Knocked me clear out of my chair!

PHILLIPS: Well, were you frightened, Mrs. Wilmuth?

MRS. WILMUTH: Well, I—I ain’t quite sure. I reckon I—I was kinda riled.

PHILLIPS: Thank you, Mr. Wilmuth. Thank you.

Which statement best describes the similarity between these versions?

A. Both versions cite expert testimony. wrong B. Both versions explain scientific terms. C. Both versions share the impressions of local residents. wrong D. Both versions show friendships developing during the crisis.

Which statement best describes the difference between the aesthetic appeal of the two versions of The War of the Worlds?

B. The written text relies on vivid description; the radio adaptation uses frenzied dialogue and sound effects.

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells’s novel The War of the Worlds:
Everything was then quite invisible, hidden by the deep pit and the heap of sand that the fall of the cylinder had made. Anyone coming along the road from Chobham or Woking would have been amazed at the sight—a dwindling multitude of perhaps a hundred people or more standing in a great irregular circle, in ditches, behind bushes, behind gates and hedges, saying little to one another and that in short, excited shouts, and staring, staring hard at a few heaps of sand.

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch’s script for Orson Welles’s radio adaptation:

PHILLIPS: Ladies and gentlemen, you’ve just heard Mr. Wilmuth, owner of the farm where this thing has fallen. I wish I could convey the atmosphere . . . the background of this . . . fantastic scene. Hundreds of cars are parked in a field in back of us. Police are trying to rope off the roadway leading to the farm. But it’s no use. They’re breaking right through. Cars’ headlights throw an enormous spot on the pit where the object’s half buried. Some of the more daring souls are now venturing near the edge. Their silhouettes stand out against the metal sheen.

(FAINT HUMMING SOUND)

One man wants to touch the thing . . . he’s having an argument with a policeman. The policeman wins . . .

Which statements describe similarities in the authors’ craft? Check all that apply.

– Both authors use descriptive adjectives. – Both authors impart an ominous mood. – Both authors cite scientific research. – Both authors offer social criticism. – Both authors use a concerned tone.

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds.

The peculiar V-shaped mouth with its pointed upper lip, the absence of brow ridges, the absence of a chin beneath the wedgelike lower lip, the incessant quivering of this mouth, the Gorgon groups of tentacles, the tumultuous breathing of the lungs in a strange atmosphere, the evident heaviness and painfulness of movement due to the greater gravitational energy of the earth—above all, the extraordinary intensity of the immense eyes—were at once vital, intense, inhuman, crippled and monstrous. There was something fungoid in the oily brown skin, something in the clumsy deliberation of the tedious movements unspeakably nasty.

Which statement best describes how Wells conveys his purpose with this excerpt?

A. He provides quotes from experts. wrong B. He shares data about the creature. C. He appeals to the reader’s beliefs. D. He uses detailed physical description.

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells’s novel The War of the Worlds:

The common round the sand pits was dotted with people, standing like myself in a half-fascinated terror, staring at these creatures, or rather at the heaped gravel at the edge of the pit in which they lay. And then, with a renewed horror, I saw a round, black object bobbing up and down on the edge of the pit. It was the head of the shopman who had fallen in, but showing as a little black object against the hot western sun. Now he got his shoulder and knee up, and again he seemed to slip back until only his head was visible. Suddenly he vanished, and I could have fancied a faint shriek had reached me.

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch’s script for Orson Welles’s radio adaptation:

PHILLIPS: Ladies and gentlemen, you’ve just heard Mr. Wilmuth, owner of the farm where this thing has fallen. I wish I could convey the atmosphere . . . the background of this . . . fantastic scene. Hundreds of cars are parked in a field in back of us. Police are trying to rope off the roadway leading to the farm. But it’s no use. They’re breaking right through. Cars’ headlights throw an enormous spot on the pit where the object’s half buried. Some of the more daring souls are now venturing near the edge. Their silhouettes stand out against the metal sheen.

Which statement best describes the similarity between these versions?

wrong A. Both versions impart an urgent tone through a resident’s words. B. Both versions impart setting details through colorful description. C. Both versions explain the background of a scientific phenomenon. D. Both versions use characterization to show the locals’ intelligence.

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds.

But, looking, I presently saw something stirring within the shadow: greyish billowy movements, one above another, and then two luminous disks—like eyes. Then something resembling a little grey snake, about the thickness of a walking stick, coiled up out of the writhing middle, and wriggled in the air towards me—and then another.

How does the author create an aesthetic impact in the excerpt?

wrong A. through realistic dialogue wrong B. through a comforting tone wrong C. through scientific explanation D. through colorful description

Which excerpt from The War of the Worlds uses a vivid visual description for aesthetic impact?

C. "A lank tentacular appendage gripped the edge of the cylinder, another swayed in the air."

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds.

The end of the cylinder was being screwed out from within. Nearly two feet of shining screw projected. Somebody blundered against me, and I narrowly missed being pitched onto the top of the screw. I turned, and as I did so the screw must have come out, for the lid of the cylinder fell upon the gravel with a ringing concussion. I stuck my elbow into the person behind me, and turned my head towards the Thing again. For a moment that circular cavity seemed perfectly black. I had the sunset in my eyes.

How does the author create an aesthetic impact in the excerpt?

B. through the suspenseful mood

Consider these versions of The War of the Worlds.

Excerpt 1, from H. G. Wells’s novel The War of the Worlds:

Then came the night of the first falling star. It was seen early in the morning, rushing over Winchester eastward, a line of flame high in the atmosphere. Hundreds must have seen it, and taken it for an ordinary falling star. Albin described it as leaving a greenish streak behind it that glowed for some seconds. Denning, our greatest authority on meteorites, stated that the height of its first appearance was about ninety or one hundred miles. It seemed to him that it fell to earth about one hundred miles east of him.

Excerpt 2, from Howard E. Koch’s script for Orson Welles’s radio adaptation:

ANNOUNCER TWO: Ladies and gentlemen, we interrupt our program of dance music to bring you a special bulletin from the Intercontinental Radio News. At twenty minutes before eight, central time, Professor Farrell of the Mount Jennings Observatory, Chicago, Illinois, reports observing several explosions of incandescent gas, occurring at regular intervals on the planet Mars. The spectroscope indicates the gas to be hydrogen and moving towards the earth with enormous velocity.

Which statement best describes the difference between these versions?

wrong A. The radio adaptation’s tone is more urgent than the novel’s tone. wrong B. The radio adaptation’s tone is more academic than the novel’s tone. wrong C. The radio adaptation’s tone is more peaceful than the novel’s tone. wrong D. The radio adaptation’s tone is more friendly than the novel’s tone.

Read the excerpt from H. G. Wells’s The War of the Worlds.

There were raised voices, and some sort of struggle appeared to be going on about the pit. Strange imaginings passed through my mind. As I drew nearer I heard Stent’s voice:

"Keep back! Keep back!"

A boy came running towards me.

"It’s a-movin’," he said to me as he passed; "a-screwin’ and a-screwin’ out. I don’t like it. I’m a-goin’ ‘ome, I am."

I went on to the crowd. There were really, I should think, two or three hundred people elbowing and jostling one another, the one or two ladies there being by no means the least active.

How does the author use tone to create an aesthetic impact in the excerpt?

wrong A. through vivid adjectives B. through tense dialogue wrong C. through expert testimony D. through background information

Share This
Flashcard

More flashcards like this

NCLEX 10000 Integumentary Disorders

When assessing a client with partial-thickness burns over 60% of the body, which finding should the nurse report immediately? a) ...

Read more

NCLEX 300-NEURO

A client with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) tells the nurse, "Sometimes I feel so frustrated. I can’t do anything without ...

Read more

NASM Flashcards

Which of the following is the process of getting oxygen from the environment to the tissues of the body? Diffusion ...

Read more

Unfinished tasks keep piling up?

Let us complete them for you. Quickly and professionally.

Check Price

Successful message
sending