Chapter 4 (Part 1) - Mid-Term 1301

The Old Plantation, a late-eighteenth-century watercolor, depicts slaves dancing. What does the portrait reveal?
a. Africans totally adopted American culture.
b. Slaves danced only when their masters ordered them to do so.
c. Slave artists could do a great deal with the limited painting supplies their masters gave them.
d. Slaves and their masters danced together, but that was the legal limit to their interaction.
e. Slaves mixed both African and European-American cultures.

e. Slaves mixed both African and European-American cultures.

Olaudah Equiano:
a. wrote the eighteenth century's most widely read account by a slave of a slave's own experiences.
b. was popular with Europeans for telling them that their culture was far superior to that of Africans like himself.
c. demonstrated in his writings that he perfectly fit the stereotype that blacks were savages incapable of becoming civilized.
d. led several Central American slave insurrections before his death.
e. was one of the few children of African-American and Native-American descent ever to be the chief of his Indian tribe.

a. wrote the eighteenth century's most widely read account by a slave of a slave's own experiences.

In the portrait of Olaudah Equiano in his book, Equiano holds a:
a. globe.
b. piece of sugar cane.
c. compass.
d. Bible.
e. gun.

d. Bible.

All of the following statements are true of the Atlantic trade in the eighteenth century EXCEPT:
a. Although important, slave-grown crops actually accounted for only a small portion of the value of the trade.
b. The profits from the slave trade in particular stimulated the rise of key English ports.
c. New England and the Middle Colonies exported fish, grain, and lumber to the West Indies.
d. Profits from the Atlantic trade helped finance the early industrial revolution.
e. Europe was the primary market for colonial-grown products such as rice and indigo.

a. Although important, slave-grown crops actually accounted for only a small portion of the value of the trade.

What did the British acquire from the Netherlands in the Treaty of Utrecht of 1713?
a. sufficient gold to pay off the British national debt
b. the right to trade at Dutch outposts in what is now South Africa
c. the right to transport slaves from Africa to Spain's New World colonies
d. New Netherland, which was then renamed New York
e. New Holland, which later became known as Australia

c. the right to transport slaves from Africa to Spain's New World colonies

Which of the following is a true statement about the Atlantic slave trade's effect in West Africa?
a. It had little effect on West Africa, because more than 90 percent of persons enslaved came from East Africa.
b. It helped lead to the rise of militarized states in West Africa, whose large armies preyed upon their neighbors in order to capture slaves.
c. It encouraged the expansion of West Africa's domestic textile industry, which supplied clothing for slaves.
d. It led to an increase in West Africa's population during the 1700s as slave traders encouraged women to have more children who would then be sold into slavery.
e. It successfully united West African nations to resist European slave traders, who reluctantly ended the trade by 1763.

b. It helped lead to the rise of militarized states in West Africa, whose large armies preyed upon their neighbors in order to capture slaves.

Which one of the following statements is NOT true of the slave trade in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world?
a. Slaves were bought and sold in the Atlantic world as part of a series of trading routes that also involved British manufactured goods and colonial products such as tobacco and sugar.
b. The Atlantic slave trade was a vital part of world commerce in the 1700s.
c. Even those in areas where slavery was only a minor institution, such as Massachusetts and Rhode Island, profited from the slave trade.
d. Slightly more than half of slaves from Africa were taken to mainland North America (what became the United States).
e. Many slaves died of diseases on board slave ships during the Middle Passage.

d. Slightly more than half of slaves from Africa were taken to mainland North America (what became the United States).

Tobacco plantations in the Chesapeake region:
a. were so profitable that their owners became the wealthiest persons in British North America by the mid-eighteenth century.
b. enlarged enormously in the 1700s because of the great economies of scale in tobacco cultivation.
c. helped make the Chesapeake colonies models of mercantilism.
d. were far less successful than tobacco plantations that developed in the lower southern colonies.
e. were known throughout the world as models of how slaves should be treated.

c. helped make the Chesapeake colonies models of mercantilism.

In the Chesapeake region, slavery:
a. was geographically restricted to the Tidewater area until transportation improved in the nineteenth century.
b. rapidly became the dominant labor system after 1680.
c. was the labor system preferred by planters as early as the 1620s.
d. allowed planters to make vast profits from cotton and rice as well as from tobacco.
e. was so widely practiced that nearly three-fifths of white households in 1770 included a slave owner.

b. rapidly became the dominant labor system after 1680.

As slave society consolidated in the Chesapeake region, what happened to free blacks?
a. They retained the same rights because they were free.
b. Their population grew rapidly through natural reproduction.
c. The British government ordered the colonies to treat them better.
d. They bought increasing numbers of plantations.
e. They lost many of their rights.

e. They lost many of their rights.

The early South Carolina economy focused on the export of deerskins and furs to England as well as on:
a. the cultivation of cotton.
b. small-scale manufacturing of firearms for use in raids against Spanish Florida.
c. the export of Indian slaves to the Caribbean.
d. shipbuilding.
e. copper mining.

c. the export of Indian slaves to the Caribbean.

The development of rice plantations in South Carolina:
a. occurred only after the colony's planters unsuccessfully sought to cultivate tobacco, sugar cane, and indigo.
b. required such large capital investments that Carolina's planters never became as wealthy as those in the Chesapeake region.
c. would have proven impossible without the importation of thousands of European indentured servants to serve as a labor force.
d. led to a black majority in that colony by the 1730s.
e. is considered by most historians to be the most important cause of the Yamasee War.

d. led to a black majority in that colony by the 1730s.

The task system:
a. was the most widely used form of labor discipline in British North America.
b. allowed slaves to own a portion of the land they worked.
c. meant that slaves were strictly supervised and had little autonomy.
d. was created by the South Carolina assembly in response to the Stono Rebellion.
e. assigned slaves daily jobs and allowed them free time upon completion of those jobs.

e. assigned slaves daily jobs and allowed them free time upon completion of those jobs.

Georgia was established by James Oglethorpe, whose causes included improved conditions for imprisoned debtors and the abolition of:
a. indentured servitude.
b. a hereditary system.
c. taxes.
d. slavery.
e. property requirements for voting.

d. slavery.

Which of the following was true of Georgia?
a. Colonists sought self-government to gain the right to introduce slavery.
b. It was the only colony to maintain a ban on liquor until independence.
c. The philanthropists who founded it expected slavery to help the lower class Englishmen they brought to the colony.
d. Its residents invaded Florida and took it from Spain in the War of Jenkins' Ear.
e. It was named for the most important British queen of the eighteenth century.

a. Colonists sought self-government to gain the right to introduce slavery.

Why was slavery less prevalent in the northern colonies?
a. Northern whites were not as racist as southern whites.
b. It was too expensive to transport slaves to the North.
c. The small farms of the northern colonies did not need slaves.
d. More reformers lived in the North.
e. The northern colonies used Indian labor instead.

c. The small farms of the northern colonies did not need slaves.

In the northern colonies, slaves:
a. lived in racially-segregated communities, which allowed them to retain African identities well into the late eighteenth century.
b. became more important in New England after the Half-Way Covenant.
c. were relatively few in number and dispersed among the white population in small holdings.
d. were forbidden by law to display any aspect of African culture in public.
e. faced far harsher treatment than they did in the South.

c. were relatively few in number and dispersed among the white population in small holdings.

Which one of the following statements about slaves in the Chesapeake is FALSE?
a. Slaves learned English.
b. Slaves participated in the Great Awakening.
c. Slaves were exposed to white culture.
d. Slaves began to experience family-centered slave communities.
e. Slave communities remained distinctly African in culture.

e. Slave communities remained distinctly African in culture.

The language (with mixed African roots) spoken by African-American slaves on the rice plantations of South Carolina and Georgia during the eighteenth century was known as:
a. Ashanti.
b. Yoruba.
c. Creole.
d. Gullah.
e. Ibo.

d. Gullah.

Which of the following is true of eighteenth-century slavery in South Carolina and Georgia?
a. The laws in those colonies created a very static institution with few differences between plantations, small farms, and cities.
b. Plantation slaves enjoyed far more autonomy than they did in other colonies, allowing them to maintain more of their African culture.
c. Because of the high death rates of Africans due to malaria, slave populations declined by 5 to 10 percent per decade during the 1700s.
d. Because the governments of South Carolina and Georgia strictly enforced laws preventing sexual contact between whites and blacks, a significant population of racially mixed individuals never developed.
e. Colonial law gave freedom to any slave who successfully escaped to Charleston or Savannah.

b. Plantation slaves enjoyed far more autonomy than they did in other colonies, allowing them to maintain more of their African culture.

The participants in South Carolina's Stono Rebellion:
a. surrendered without any bloodshed and agreed to pledge loyalty to the colony.
b. were mostly former indentured servants upset over the colony's Indian policy.
c. included some who apparently had been soldiers in Africa.
d. laid siege to Charleston but had to retreat when the Royal Navy brought reinforcements.
e. were unsuccessful because of divisions over language and ethnicity.

c. included some who apparently had been soldiers in Africa.

The 1741 panic in New York City that led to 34 executions was sparked by:
a. a series of murders.
b. the seizing of the armory.
c. a rally of boisterous Irish.
d. the imprisonment of twenty free blacks.
e. a series of fires.

e. a series of fires.

Slave resistance in the eighteenth century:
a. was limited to running away, since mounting an armed rebellion would have been impossible and deadly.
b. included rebellions in both northern and southern colonies that led to the deaths of several of those involved in planning the conspiracies.
c. most famously included the War of Jenkins' Ear, fought over the habit that masters developed of slicing off the ears of rebellious slaves.
d. prompted southern lawmakers to cut off slave imports from Africa and the Caribbean by mid-century.
e. led to a strong but ultimately unsuccessful movement to abolish slavery in Georgia in the 1760s.

b. included rebellions in both northern and southern colonies that led to the deaths of several of those involved in planning the conspiracies.

During the eighteenth century, British patriotism:
a. reflected the rise of Spain as Great Britain's traditional enemy, in place of France.
b. emphasized England's freedom of religion.
c. celebrated individual freedom and the rule of law.
d. included the admission that slavery and freedom were wholly contradictory.
e. was the subject of numerous satires by Benjamin Franklin.

c. celebrated individual freedom and the rule of law.

The British concept of liberty:
a. allowed for unrestrained government authority, since restraints would contradict the very idea of liberty.
b. meant that liberty and power could be compatible.
c. was a constant reminder to the British that their governmental system was not the best means of preventing absolutism.
d. had no connections to how the British viewed their empire.
e. included both formal restraints on authority and a collection of specific rights.

e. included both formal restraints on authority and a collection of specific rights.

The language of British liberty:
a. was Latin and Greek, reflecting the emphasis that the educated upper class put on the subject.
b. did not include the idea that the people had the right to protest government actions.
c. excluded those outside the "political nation" (meaning those who voted or held office).
d. allowed those outside of office to speak openly, but not to write down their views.
e. was used by humble members of society as well as by the elite.

e. was used by humble members of society as well as by the elite.

The British Country Party:
a. declined in popularity as England became an increasingly urbanized country.
b. underwrote the expenses of a large number of the migrants to the American colonies.
c. opposed the power of the landed gentry in British politics.
d. sought to stop corruption in British politics.
e. required its leaders to dress in work clothes to promote the idea of being "of the people."

d. sought to stop corruption in British politics.

"Republicanism" in the eighteenth-century Anglo-American political world emphasized the importance of ____________ as the essence of liberty.
a. protecting the natural rights of all humans
b. active participation in public life by property-owning citizens
c. a strong central state
d. supporting royal authority as opposed to parliamentary authority
e. voting rights for all adult men

b. active participation in public life by property-owning citizens

John Locke's political philosophy stressed:
a. a contract system between the people and the government.
b. the necessity to good government of the monarch having absolute power.
c. that mercantilism was necessary for a strong nation.
d. religious toleration for all.
e. that strong government prevented a "war of all against all."

a. a contract system between the people and the government.

The idea of liberalism in eighteenth-century British politics:
a. had the same meaning as liberalism in twenty-first-century American politics.
b. had mainly a civic and social quality.
c. brought great wealth and power to its main voice, John Locke.
d. was compatible with inequalities in wealth and well-being.
e. prompted two eighteenth-century leaders, Joseph McCarthy and Hugh McCarran, to demand independence for Ireland.

d. was compatible with inequalities in wealth and well-being.

Chapter 4 (Part 1) - Mid-Term 1301 - Subjecto.com

Chapter 4 (Part 1) – Mid-Term 1301

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The Old Plantation, a late-eighteenth-century watercolor, depicts slaves dancing. What does the portrait reveal?
a. Africans totally adopted American culture.
b. Slaves danced only when their masters ordered them to do so.
c. Slave artists could do a great deal with the limited painting supplies their masters gave them.
d. Slaves and their masters danced together, but that was the legal limit to their interaction.
e. Slaves mixed both African and European-American cultures.

e. Slaves mixed both African and European-American cultures.

Olaudah Equiano:
a. wrote the eighteenth century’s most widely read account by a slave of a slave’s own experiences.
b. was popular with Europeans for telling them that their culture was far superior to that of Africans like himself.
c. demonstrated in his writings that he perfectly fit the stereotype that blacks were savages incapable of becoming civilized.
d. led several Central American slave insurrections before his death.
e. was one of the few children of African-American and Native-American descent ever to be the chief of his Indian tribe.

a. wrote the eighteenth century’s most widely read account by a slave of a slave’s own experiences.

In the portrait of Olaudah Equiano in his book, Equiano holds a:
a. globe.
b. piece of sugar cane.
c. compass.
d. Bible.
e. gun.

d. Bible.

All of the following statements are true of the Atlantic trade in the eighteenth century EXCEPT:
a. Although important, slave-grown crops actually accounted for only a small portion of the value of the trade.
b. The profits from the slave trade in particular stimulated the rise of key English ports.
c. New England and the Middle Colonies exported fish, grain, and lumber to the West Indies.
d. Profits from the Atlantic trade helped finance the early industrial revolution.
e. Europe was the primary market for colonial-grown products such as rice and indigo.

a. Although important, slave-grown crops actually accounted for only a small portion of the value of the trade.

What did the British acquire from the Netherlands in the Treaty of Utrecht of 1713?
a. sufficient gold to pay off the British national debt
b. the right to trade at Dutch outposts in what is now South Africa
c. the right to transport slaves from Africa to Spain’s New World colonies
d. New Netherland, which was then renamed New York
e. New Holland, which later became known as Australia

c. the right to transport slaves from Africa to Spain’s New World colonies

Which of the following is a true statement about the Atlantic slave trade’s effect in West Africa?
a. It had little effect on West Africa, because more than 90 percent of persons enslaved came from East Africa.
b. It helped lead to the rise of militarized states in West Africa, whose large armies preyed upon their neighbors in order to capture slaves.
c. It encouraged the expansion of West Africa’s domestic textile industry, which supplied clothing for slaves.
d. It led to an increase in West Africa’s population during the 1700s as slave traders encouraged women to have more children who would then be sold into slavery.
e. It successfully united West African nations to resist European slave traders, who reluctantly ended the trade by 1763.

b. It helped lead to the rise of militarized states in West Africa, whose large armies preyed upon their neighbors in order to capture slaves.

Which one of the following statements is NOT true of the slave trade in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world?
a. Slaves were bought and sold in the Atlantic world as part of a series of trading routes that also involved British manufactured goods and colonial products such as tobacco and sugar.
b. The Atlantic slave trade was a vital part of world commerce in the 1700s.
c. Even those in areas where slavery was only a minor institution, such as Massachusetts and Rhode Island, profited from the slave trade.
d. Slightly more than half of slaves from Africa were taken to mainland North America (what became the United States).
e. Many slaves died of diseases on board slave ships during the Middle Passage.

d. Slightly more than half of slaves from Africa were taken to mainland North America (what became the United States).

Tobacco plantations in the Chesapeake region:
a. were so profitable that their owners became the wealthiest persons in British North America by the mid-eighteenth century.
b. enlarged enormously in the 1700s because of the great economies of scale in tobacco cultivation.
c. helped make the Chesapeake colonies models of mercantilism.
d. were far less successful than tobacco plantations that developed in the lower southern colonies.
e. were known throughout the world as models of how slaves should be treated.

c. helped make the Chesapeake colonies models of mercantilism.

In the Chesapeake region, slavery:
a. was geographically restricted to the Tidewater area until transportation improved in the nineteenth century.
b. rapidly became the dominant labor system after 1680.
c. was the labor system preferred by planters as early as the 1620s.
d. allowed planters to make vast profits from cotton and rice as well as from tobacco.
e. was so widely practiced that nearly three-fifths of white households in 1770 included a slave owner.

b. rapidly became the dominant labor system after 1680.

As slave society consolidated in the Chesapeake region, what happened to free blacks?
a. They retained the same rights because they were free.
b. Their population grew rapidly through natural reproduction.
c. The British government ordered the colonies to treat them better.
d. They bought increasing numbers of plantations.
e. They lost many of their rights.

e. They lost many of their rights.

The early South Carolina economy focused on the export of deerskins and furs to England as well as on:
a. the cultivation of cotton.
b. small-scale manufacturing of firearms for use in raids against Spanish Florida.
c. the export of Indian slaves to the Caribbean.
d. shipbuilding.
e. copper mining.

c. the export of Indian slaves to the Caribbean.

The development of rice plantations in South Carolina:
a. occurred only after the colony’s planters unsuccessfully sought to cultivate tobacco, sugar cane, and indigo.
b. required such large capital investments that Carolina’s planters never became as wealthy as those in the Chesapeake region.
c. would have proven impossible without the importation of thousands of European indentured servants to serve as a labor force.
d. led to a black majority in that colony by the 1730s.
e. is considered by most historians to be the most important cause of the Yamasee War.

d. led to a black majority in that colony by the 1730s.

The task system:
a. was the most widely used form of labor discipline in British North America.
b. allowed slaves to own a portion of the land they worked.
c. meant that slaves were strictly supervised and had little autonomy.
d. was created by the South Carolina assembly in response to the Stono Rebellion.
e. assigned slaves daily jobs and allowed them free time upon completion of those jobs.

e. assigned slaves daily jobs and allowed them free time upon completion of those jobs.

Georgia was established by James Oglethorpe, whose causes included improved conditions for imprisoned debtors and the abolition of:
a. indentured servitude.
b. a hereditary system.
c. taxes.
d. slavery.
e. property requirements for voting.

d. slavery.

Which of the following was true of Georgia?
a. Colonists sought self-government to gain the right to introduce slavery.
b. It was the only colony to maintain a ban on liquor until independence.
c. The philanthropists who founded it expected slavery to help the lower class Englishmen they brought to the colony.
d. Its residents invaded Florida and took it from Spain in the War of Jenkins’ Ear.
e. It was named for the most important British queen of the eighteenth century.

a. Colonists sought self-government to gain the right to introduce slavery.

Why was slavery less prevalent in the northern colonies?
a. Northern whites were not as racist as southern whites.
b. It was too expensive to transport slaves to the North.
c. The small farms of the northern colonies did not need slaves.
d. More reformers lived in the North.
e. The northern colonies used Indian labor instead.

c. The small farms of the northern colonies did not need slaves.

In the northern colonies, slaves:
a. lived in racially-segregated communities, which allowed them to retain African identities well into the late eighteenth century.
b. became more important in New England after the Half-Way Covenant.
c. were relatively few in number and dispersed among the white population in small holdings.
d. were forbidden by law to display any aspect of African culture in public.
e. faced far harsher treatment than they did in the South.

c. were relatively few in number and dispersed among the white population in small holdings.

Which one of the following statements about slaves in the Chesapeake is FALSE?
a. Slaves learned English.
b. Slaves participated in the Great Awakening.
c. Slaves were exposed to white culture.
d. Slaves began to experience family-centered slave communities.
e. Slave communities remained distinctly African in culture.

e. Slave communities remained distinctly African in culture.

The language (with mixed African roots) spoken by African-American slaves on the rice plantations of South Carolina and Georgia during the eighteenth century was known as:
a. Ashanti.
b. Yoruba.
c. Creole.
d. Gullah.
e. Ibo.

d. Gullah.

Which of the following is true of eighteenth-century slavery in South Carolina and Georgia?
a. The laws in those colonies created a very static institution with few differences between plantations, small farms, and cities.
b. Plantation slaves enjoyed far more autonomy than they did in other colonies, allowing them to maintain more of their African culture.
c. Because of the high death rates of Africans due to malaria, slave populations declined by 5 to 10 percent per decade during the 1700s.
d. Because the governments of South Carolina and Georgia strictly enforced laws preventing sexual contact between whites and blacks, a significant population of racially mixed individuals never developed.
e. Colonial law gave freedom to any slave who successfully escaped to Charleston or Savannah.

b. Plantation slaves enjoyed far more autonomy than they did in other colonies, allowing them to maintain more of their African culture.

The participants in South Carolina’s Stono Rebellion:
a. surrendered without any bloodshed and agreed to pledge loyalty to the colony.
b. were mostly former indentured servants upset over the colony’s Indian policy.
c. included some who apparently had been soldiers in Africa.
d. laid siege to Charleston but had to retreat when the Royal Navy brought reinforcements.
e. were unsuccessful because of divisions over language and ethnicity.

c. included some who apparently had been soldiers in Africa.

The 1741 panic in New York City that led to 34 executions was sparked by:
a. a series of murders.
b. the seizing of the armory.
c. a rally of boisterous Irish.
d. the imprisonment of twenty free blacks.
e. a series of fires.

e. a series of fires.

Slave resistance in the eighteenth century:
a. was limited to running away, since mounting an armed rebellion would have been impossible and deadly.
b. included rebellions in both northern and southern colonies that led to the deaths of several of those involved in planning the conspiracies.
c. most famously included the War of Jenkins’ Ear, fought over the habit that masters developed of slicing off the ears of rebellious slaves.
d. prompted southern lawmakers to cut off slave imports from Africa and the Caribbean by mid-century.
e. led to a strong but ultimately unsuccessful movement to abolish slavery in Georgia in the 1760s.

b. included rebellions in both northern and southern colonies that led to the deaths of several of those involved in planning the conspiracies.

During the eighteenth century, British patriotism:
a. reflected the rise of Spain as Great Britain’s traditional enemy, in place of France.
b. emphasized England’s freedom of religion.
c. celebrated individual freedom and the rule of law.
d. included the admission that slavery and freedom were wholly contradictory.
e. was the subject of numerous satires by Benjamin Franklin.

c. celebrated individual freedom and the rule of law.

The British concept of liberty:
a. allowed for unrestrained government authority, since restraints would contradict the very idea of liberty.
b. meant that liberty and power could be compatible.
c. was a constant reminder to the British that their governmental system was not the best means of preventing absolutism.
d. had no connections to how the British viewed their empire.
e. included both formal restraints on authority and a collection of specific rights.

e. included both formal restraints on authority and a collection of specific rights.

The language of British liberty:
a. was Latin and Greek, reflecting the emphasis that the educated upper class put on the subject.
b. did not include the idea that the people had the right to protest government actions.
c. excluded those outside the "political nation" (meaning those who voted or held office).
d. allowed those outside of office to speak openly, but not to write down their views.
e. was used by humble members of society as well as by the elite.

e. was used by humble members of society as well as by the elite.

The British Country Party:
a. declined in popularity as England became an increasingly urbanized country.
b. underwrote the expenses of a large number of the migrants to the American colonies.
c. opposed the power of the landed gentry in British politics.
d. sought to stop corruption in British politics.
e. required its leaders to dress in work clothes to promote the idea of being "of the people."

d. sought to stop corruption in British politics.

"Republicanism" in the eighteenth-century Anglo-American political world emphasized the importance of ____________ as the essence of liberty.
a. protecting the natural rights of all humans
b. active participation in public life by property-owning citizens
c. a strong central state
d. supporting royal authority as opposed to parliamentary authority
e. voting rights for all adult men

b. active participation in public life by property-owning citizens

John Locke’s political philosophy stressed:
a. a contract system between the people and the government.
b. the necessity to good government of the monarch having absolute power.
c. that mercantilism was necessary for a strong nation.
d. religious toleration for all.
e. that strong government prevented a "war of all against all."

a. a contract system between the people and the government.

The idea of liberalism in eighteenth-century British politics:
a. had the same meaning as liberalism in twenty-first-century American politics.
b. had mainly a civic and social quality.
c. brought great wealth and power to its main voice, John Locke.
d. was compatible with inequalities in wealth and well-being.
e. prompted two eighteenth-century leaders, Joseph McCarthy and Hugh McCarran, to demand independence for Ireland.

d. was compatible with inequalities in wealth and well-being.

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