Chapter 16 - Quiz

**1. A century age, the average life span worldwide was less than age _____. Today it is about age _____.

A) 40; 70
B) 20; 30
C) 50; 100
D) 30; 80

a

2. Themes around death that occurred in all the known ancient cultures include all of the following EXCEPT _____.

A) mourners respond to death with a set of rituals
B) all dead bodies must be buried in the ground
C) actions in life impact what happens after death
D) an afterlife exists

b

**3. In Korea, how did religious practice change with regard to autopsies?

A) Religious leaders forbid autopsies.
B) A religious service was developed for people whose bodies have been donated for autopsy.
C) Egyptian traditions were fused with Korean customs.
D) Most people abandoned religious ceremonies because of their opposition to autopsies.

b

4. Laurel's mother has been reluctant to tell her that Grandpa George is dead. After keeping Laurel home with a babysitter during the funeral, her mother has said things like, "Grandpa George had to go away." But Laurel, who has heard adults talking about the death, senses that her mother is avoiding the topic and has come to the conclusion that _____.

A) adults just want to protect their children
B) the conversations were probably false and Grandpa George is just away for a while
C) death is a terrifying topic that even adults can't discuss
D) there are some things kids just shouldn't know

c

5. According to _____, adolescents and emerging adults engage in high-risk behaviors to cope with their fear of death.

A) Maslow's hierarchy of needs
B) terror management theory
C) reincarnation
D) bereavement

b

6. Poet Dylan Thomas didn't want his father to die or to go easily into death. Why do adults express this kind of sentiment about other people's death?

A) It helps them to defend against the fear of aging and untimely death.
B) They don't want to lose their loved ones to death.
C) They aren't sure they will be able to get time off to attend the funeral.
D) It helps keep them motivated to live healthily.

a

7. Across cultures, a result of near-death experiences is _____.

A) an increased fear of death
B) scientific data on what happens to the dead
C) a loss of the will to live
D) a sense of hopefulness

d

8. According to Kübler-Ross, the first stage of dying is _____.

A) anger
B) denial
C) depression
D) bargaining

b

**9. Mrs. Reginald has been diagnosed as terminally ill, but she insists that she will recover and believes that her laboratory results were mixed up or misinterpreted. Kübler-Ross would say that Mrs. Reginald is in the stage of _____.

A) acceptance
B) bargaining
C) denial
D) depression

c

10. W which of the following is a stage of dying based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs?

A) safety
B) denial
C) forgiveness
D) depression

a

**11. Maslow has added a sixth stage to his hierarchy. This stage, called _____, emphasizes the acceptance of death by dying people.

A) self-actualization
B) self-transcendence
C) love and acceptance
D) acceptance

b

12. Which of the following statements regarding hospice care is TRUE?

A) People are admitted only when there is reasonable chance for recovery.
B) Patients can be admitted only if death is likely within six months.
C) No medications are available once a patient moves into hospice.
D) Currently, no insurance companies cover hospice services.

b

13. The goal of palliative care is to _____.

A) relieve patients' pain and suffering
B) treat terminal illnesses
C) study the experience of the dying
D) treat advanced-stage diseases by any means possible

a

**14. Nilda has just been evaluated by medical professionals. She cannot move any part of her body, except for her eyes, but brain waves are still apparent. The doctor explains that Nilda is not dead but _____.

A) has brain death
B) is in a coma
C) is in a vegetative state
D) has locked-in syndrome

d

15. The definition of death that has been used by professionals around the world for more than 40 years states that death occurs when _____.

A) the person enters locked-in syndrome
B) the eyes alone respond to pain
C) noticeable respiration ceases
D) brain waves cease

d

**16. After a meta-analysis of studies on end-of-life brain functioning, researchers confirmed two indicators of death are _____.

A) eye movement in the absence of brain waves and ceased respiration
B) slow brain waves and ceased respiration
C) eyes not responding to pain and the lack of heartbeat
D) no spontaneous breathing and eyes not responding to pain

d

17. Malcolm entered a state of deep unconsciousness after a serious accident. Although he is still breathing, his cognitive functions have ceased. His family and friends notice that his eyes occasionally open, and he sometimes makes sounds. Malcolm _____.

A) is in a coma
B) has brain death
C) is in a vegetative state
D) has locked-in syndrome

c

18. A person with which of the following conditions is considered dead?

A) a coma
B) brain death
C) a vegetative state
D) locked-in syndrome

b

19. Which of the following is an example of passive euthanasia?

A) A doctor gives a patient a prescription for a lethal medication.
B) A husband injects his wife with an overdose of her medication, without her requesting this of him.
C) A patient asks his adult child to give him a lethal injection.
D) A doctor does not resuscitate a man who stops breathing because the man has a DNR
order.

d

20. A person whom a dying person designates to make his or her medical decisions if he or she is unable to do so is a(n) _____.

A) adult child
B) health care proxy
C) attorney
D) hospice worker

b

21. Natalia's father just died. She was very close to him and simply cannot face the reality of his death. To those around her, it appears that Natalia is not grieving at all. Natalia is experiencing _____ grief.

A) complicated
B) disenfranchised
C) absent
D) incomplete

c

22. The type of grief in which people are not allowed to mourn publicly because of cultural customs or social restrictions is called _____.

A) incomplete grief
B) disenfranchised grief
C) complicated grief
D) absent grief

b

23. The public and ritualistic expression of bereavement is called _____.

A) mourning
B) sadness
C) a near-death experience
D) palliative care

a

24. An important function of the mourning process is to _____.

A) allow a private expression of pain following a death
B) allow expression of grief publicly
C) identify a point of blame for the death
D) take one's mind off the loss of a loved one

b

25. Older adults who were securely attached in childhood are more likely to experience _____ grief when a loved one dies.

A) absent
B) complicated
C) normal
D) very little

c

26. Death occurs later today than it did 100 years ago.

A) True B) False

true

27. Fear of death tends to subside in middle age.

A) True B) False

false

28. Michael barely survived a horrendous car crash. As he lay on the road close to death, he said he was surrounded by a white light and felt joy and peace. He was experiencing palliative care.

A) True B) False

false

29. A good death is often considered to be one that is quick, peaceful, and in the presence of family and friends.

A) True B) False

true

30. Passive euthanasia is illegal everywhere.

A) True B) False

false

31. An advance directive is an individual's instructions regarding end-of-life medical care.

A) True B) False

false

**32. A large number of people—about 30 percent—experience complicated grief.

A) True B) False

false

33. One function of mourning customs is to allow for public displays of grief.

A) True B) False

true

34. In recent decades, many people everywhere have become less religiously devout, and mourning practices are less ritualized.

A) True B) False

true

35. If individuals do not move on quickly after grieving the loss of a loved one, pathological incomplete grief will result.

A) True B) False

false

36. The theory that adolescents and emerging adults engage in high-risk behaviors to cope with their fear of death is called _____.

terror management theory

37. After he recovered from a severe heart attack, Brian said he remembered being surrounded by a white light and feeling at peace. Brian described a _____.

near-death experience

38. Dying that is peaceful, quick, and at home is often considered to be a _____ death.

good

**39. In her stages of dying, Kübler-Ross was identifying the _____ experienced by dying people and their loved ones.

emotions

**40. In a hospice environment, dying individuals receive medications, massages, and other pain-relieving measures but no _____ interventions.

life-prolonging

41. A _____ is a state of deep unconsciousness from which the person cannot be aroused.

coma

**42. Some people believe that allowing physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia will lead to a _____, in which more and more extensive practices of eliminating the elderly, the disabled, or the poor will occur.

slippery slope

43. _____ is the public and ritualistic expression of bereavement, the ceremonies and behaviors that a religion or culture prescribes to honor the dead.

mourning

**44. The fact that the grief-stricken are vulnerable not only to irrational thoughts but also to self-destructive acts explains why _____ is beneficial.

mourning

**45. A longitudinal study found that almost all widows and widowers _____ their past marriages, a tendency that has been correlated with psychological health.

idealize (romanticize)

46. Name the central issues for terminally ill individuals during any three points of the life span: childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood, adulthood, and late adulthood.

At each life stage, individuals have different kinds of fears regarding death. For example, terminally ill children tend to fear being abandoned or alone, so health care providers should allow family members to remain present at all times. Death must be discussed with children (as it is made scarier by avoiding the topic). Counselors emphasize that adults must listen to teenagers. Self-expression is part of the search for identity; dying does not stop that search. Teenagers and emerging adults may seek to control their death anxiety by taking risks. Other research in many nations finds that when adolescents and emerging adults think about death, they sometimes become more patriotic and religious but less tolerant of other worldviews and less generous to people of other nations. With adults, concern about leaving something undone or abandoning family members, especially children, tends to be paramount. In late adulthood, anxiety about death has likely decreased and hope has increased. Developmentalists believe that one sign of mental health among older adults is acceptance of their own mortality.

47. Define a good death. Explain three steps that medical professionals can take to help individuals experience a good death.

A good death is at the end of a long life; in the presence of loved ones; in familiar surroundings; peaceful; quick; and without pain, confusion, or discomfort. Answers may vary somewhat, but the student should demonstrate an understanding of the medical professionals' role in the patient's experience of the time before he or she dies. Steps that medical professionals can take to ensure a good death include talking honestly about the pros and cons of life-prolonging interventions, offering pain management, allowing family and friends to visit freely, and letting the terminally ill leave the hospital and die at home or in a hospice chance of recovery. when there is no

48. What is the goal of hospice care? Who does it serve? What barriers can keep people from receiving this kind of care?

The goal of hospice care is to allow dying individuals to spend their last days in comfort outside of a hospital and to support the close friends and family of the dying individual. Hospice serves dying people (who have less than six months to live) by respecting their wishes and providing a level of pain management that meets their needs. It serves loved ones by providing counseling and guidance. Barriers to hospice care include that it is expensive, it is not available everywhere, admitted patients must be terminally ill and approaching death (within six months), and both the patient and patient's loved ones must accept death to accept hospice services.

49. Name and describe the two controversial practices in which a dying person is helped to terminate his or her own life.

The two controversial practices are active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Active euthanasia occurs when someone answers a dying person's request for assistance to end life, such as giving a fatal injection or unplugging life support machines. Physician-assisted suicide is a form of active euthanasia. It occurs when the doctor provides the means for a patient to end his or her own life, usually by prescribing lethal drugs.

50. Apply the notion of "placing blame and seeking meaning" to a tragic death (or the tragic deaths of many people) that has been in the news recently. What actions did mourners take after the event?

For public deaths on a national scale, such as the killing of innocent civilians in a war-torn area, one nation will blame another, and often protests will ensue. Mourners may also protest after deaths caused by a drunk driver, dangerous intersection, gun violence, or preventable violence. They often seek to change laws and raise awareness. Mourners will often create memorials—sometimes tied to the place of tragedy or sometimes to share the news of their loss widely (as with online obituaries). Mourners will often also find connection with others who have been through a similar tragedy, as when parents who lost children to violence join a support group to provide assistance to one another.

Chapter 16 - Quiz - Subjecto.com

Chapter 16 – Quiz

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**1. A century age, the average life span worldwide was less than age _____. Today it is about age _____.

A) 40; 70
B) 20; 30
C) 50; 100
D) 30; 80

a

2. Themes around death that occurred in all the known ancient cultures include all of the following EXCEPT _____.

A) mourners respond to death with a set of rituals
B) all dead bodies must be buried in the ground
C) actions in life impact what happens after death
D) an afterlife exists

b

**3. In Korea, how did religious practice change with regard to autopsies?

A) Religious leaders forbid autopsies.
B) A religious service was developed for people whose bodies have been donated for autopsy.
C) Egyptian traditions were fused with Korean customs.
D) Most people abandoned religious ceremonies because of their opposition to autopsies.

b

4. Laurel’s mother has been reluctant to tell her that Grandpa George is dead. After keeping Laurel home with a babysitter during the funeral, her mother has said things like, "Grandpa George had to go away." But Laurel, who has heard adults talking about the death, senses that her mother is avoiding the topic and has come to the conclusion that _____.

A) adults just want to protect their children
B) the conversations were probably false and Grandpa George is just away for a while
C) death is a terrifying topic that even adults can’t discuss
D) there are some things kids just shouldn’t know

c

5. According to _____, adolescents and emerging adults engage in high-risk behaviors to cope with their fear of death.

A) Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
B) terror management theory
C) reincarnation
D) bereavement

b

6. Poet Dylan Thomas didn’t want his father to die or to go easily into death. Why do adults express this kind of sentiment about other people’s death?

A) It helps them to defend against the fear of aging and untimely death.
B) They don’t want to lose their loved ones to death.
C) They aren’t sure they will be able to get time off to attend the funeral.
D) It helps keep them motivated to live healthily.

a

7. Across cultures, a result of near-death experiences is _____.

A) an increased fear of death
B) scientific data on what happens to the dead
C) a loss of the will to live
D) a sense of hopefulness

d

8. According to Kübler-Ross, the first stage of dying is _____.

A) anger
B) denial
C) depression
D) bargaining

b

**9. Mrs. Reginald has been diagnosed as terminally ill, but she insists that she will recover and believes that her laboratory results were mixed up or misinterpreted. Kübler-Ross would say that Mrs. Reginald is in the stage of _____.

A) acceptance
B) bargaining
C) denial
D) depression

c

10. W which of the following is a stage of dying based on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs?

A) safety
B) denial
C) forgiveness
D) depression

a

**11. Maslow has added a sixth stage to his hierarchy. This stage, called _____, emphasizes the acceptance of death by dying people.

A) self-actualization
B) self-transcendence
C) love and acceptance
D) acceptance

b

12. Which of the following statements regarding hospice care is TRUE?

A) People are admitted only when there is reasonable chance for recovery.
B) Patients can be admitted only if death is likely within six months.
C) No medications are available once a patient moves into hospice.
D) Currently, no insurance companies cover hospice services.

b

13. The goal of palliative care is to _____.

A) relieve patients’ pain and suffering
B) treat terminal illnesses
C) study the experience of the dying
D) treat advanced-stage diseases by any means possible

a

**14. Nilda has just been evaluated by medical professionals. She cannot move any part of her body, except for her eyes, but brain waves are still apparent. The doctor explains that Nilda is not dead but _____.

A) has brain death
B) is in a coma
C) is in a vegetative state
D) has locked-in syndrome

d

15. The definition of death that has been used by professionals around the world for more than 40 years states that death occurs when _____.

A) the person enters locked-in syndrome
B) the eyes alone respond to pain
C) noticeable respiration ceases
D) brain waves cease

d

**16. After a meta-analysis of studies on end-of-life brain functioning, researchers confirmed two indicators of death are _____.

A) eye movement in the absence of brain waves and ceased respiration
B) slow brain waves and ceased respiration
C) eyes not responding to pain and the lack of heartbeat
D) no spontaneous breathing and eyes not responding to pain

d

17. Malcolm entered a state of deep unconsciousness after a serious accident. Although he is still breathing, his cognitive functions have ceased. His family and friends notice that his eyes occasionally open, and he sometimes makes sounds. Malcolm _____.

A) is in a coma
B) has brain death
C) is in a vegetative state
D) has locked-in syndrome

c

18. A person with which of the following conditions is considered dead?

A) a coma
B) brain death
C) a vegetative state
D) locked-in syndrome

b

19. Which of the following is an example of passive euthanasia?

A) A doctor gives a patient a prescription for a lethal medication.
B) A husband injects his wife with an overdose of her medication, without her requesting this of him.
C) A patient asks his adult child to give him a lethal injection.
D) A doctor does not resuscitate a man who stops breathing because the man has a DNR
order.

d

20. A person whom a dying person designates to make his or her medical decisions if he or she is unable to do so is a(n) _____.

A) adult child
B) health care proxy
C) attorney
D) hospice worker

b

21. Natalia’s father just died. She was very close to him and simply cannot face the reality of his death. To those around her, it appears that Natalia is not grieving at all. Natalia is experiencing _____ grief.

A) complicated
B) disenfranchised
C) absent
D) incomplete

c

22. The type of grief in which people are not allowed to mourn publicly because of cultural customs or social restrictions is called _____.

A) incomplete grief
B) disenfranchised grief
C) complicated grief
D) absent grief

b

23. The public and ritualistic expression of bereavement is called _____.

A) mourning
B) sadness
C) a near-death experience
D) palliative care

a

24. An important function of the mourning process is to _____.

A) allow a private expression of pain following a death
B) allow expression of grief publicly
C) identify a point of blame for the death
D) take one’s mind off the loss of a loved one

b

25. Older adults who were securely attached in childhood are more likely to experience _____ grief when a loved one dies.

A) absent
B) complicated
C) normal
D) very little

c

26. Death occurs later today than it did 100 years ago.

A) True B) False

true

27. Fear of death tends to subside in middle age.

A) True B) False

false

28. Michael barely survived a horrendous car crash. As he lay on the road close to death, he said he was surrounded by a white light and felt joy and peace. He was experiencing palliative care.

A) True B) False

false

29. A good death is often considered to be one that is quick, peaceful, and in the presence of family and friends.

A) True B) False

true

30. Passive euthanasia is illegal everywhere.

A) True B) False

false

31. An advance directive is an individual’s instructions regarding end-of-life medical care.

A) True B) False

false

**32. A large number of people—about 30 percent—experience complicated grief.

A) True B) False

false

33. One function of mourning customs is to allow for public displays of grief.

A) True B) False

true

34. In recent decades, many people everywhere have become less religiously devout, and mourning practices are less ritualized.

A) True B) False

true

35. If individuals do not move on quickly after grieving the loss of a loved one, pathological incomplete grief will result.

A) True B) False

false

36. The theory that adolescents and emerging adults engage in high-risk behaviors to cope with their fear of death is called _____.

terror management theory

37. After he recovered from a severe heart attack, Brian said he remembered being surrounded by a white light and feeling at peace. Brian described a _____.

near-death experience

38. Dying that is peaceful, quick, and at home is often considered to be a _____ death.

good

**39. In her stages of dying, Kübler-Ross was identifying the _____ experienced by dying people and their loved ones.

emotions

**40. In a hospice environment, dying individuals receive medications, massages, and other pain-relieving measures but no _____ interventions.

life-prolonging

41. A _____ is a state of deep unconsciousness from which the person cannot be aroused.

coma

**42. Some people believe that allowing physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia will lead to a _____, in which more and more extensive practices of eliminating the elderly, the disabled, or the poor will occur.

slippery slope

43. _____ is the public and ritualistic expression of bereavement, the ceremonies and behaviors that a religion or culture prescribes to honor the dead.

mourning

**44. The fact that the grief-stricken are vulnerable not only to irrational thoughts but also to self-destructive acts explains why _____ is beneficial.

mourning

**45. A longitudinal study found that almost all widows and widowers _____ their past marriages, a tendency that has been correlated with psychological health.

idealize (romanticize)

46. Name the central issues for terminally ill individuals during any three points of the life span: childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood, adulthood, and late adulthood.

At each life stage, individuals have different kinds of fears regarding death. For example, terminally ill children tend to fear being abandoned or alone, so health care providers should allow family members to remain present at all times. Death must be discussed with children (as it is made scarier by avoiding the topic). Counselors emphasize that adults must listen to teenagers. Self-expression is part of the search for identity; dying does not stop that search. Teenagers and emerging adults may seek to control their death anxiety by taking risks. Other research in many nations finds that when adolescents and emerging adults think about death, they sometimes become more patriotic and religious but less tolerant of other worldviews and less generous to people of other nations. With adults, concern about leaving something undone or abandoning family members, especially children, tends to be paramount. In late adulthood, anxiety about death has likely decreased and hope has increased. Developmentalists believe that one sign of mental health among older adults is acceptance of their own mortality.

47. Define a good death. Explain three steps that medical professionals can take to help individuals experience a good death.

A good death is at the end of a long life; in the presence of loved ones; in familiar surroundings; peaceful; quick; and without pain, confusion, or discomfort. Answers may vary somewhat, but the student should demonstrate an understanding of the medical professionals’ role in the patient’s experience of the time before he or she dies. Steps that medical professionals can take to ensure a good death include talking honestly about the pros and cons of life-prolonging interventions, offering pain management, allowing family and friends to visit freely, and letting the terminally ill leave the hospital and die at home or in a hospice chance of recovery. when there is no

48. What is the goal of hospice care? Who does it serve? What barriers can keep people from receiving this kind of care?

The goal of hospice care is to allow dying individuals to spend their last days in comfort outside of a hospital and to support the close friends and family of the dying individual. Hospice serves dying people (who have less than six months to live) by respecting their wishes and providing a level of pain management that meets their needs. It serves loved ones by providing counseling and guidance. Barriers to hospice care include that it is expensive, it is not available everywhere, admitted patients must be terminally ill and approaching death (within six months), and both the patient and patient’s loved ones must accept death to accept hospice services.

49. Name and describe the two controversial practices in which a dying person is helped to terminate his or her own life.

The two controversial practices are active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Active euthanasia occurs when someone answers a dying person’s request for assistance to end life, such as giving a fatal injection or unplugging life support machines. Physician-assisted suicide is a form of active euthanasia. It occurs when the doctor provides the means for a patient to end his or her own life, usually by prescribing lethal drugs.

50. Apply the notion of "placing blame and seeking meaning" to a tragic death (or the tragic deaths of many people) that has been in the news recently. What actions did mourners take after the event?

For public deaths on a national scale, such as the killing of innocent civilians in a war-torn area, one nation will blame another, and often protests will ensue. Mourners may also protest after deaths caused by a drunk driver, dangerous intersection, gun violence, or preventable violence. They often seek to change laws and raise awareness. Mourners will often create memorials—sometimes tied to the place of tragedy or sometimes to share the news of their loss widely (as with online obituaries). Mourners will often also find connection with others who have been through a similar tragedy, as when parents who lost children to violence join a support group to provide assistance to one another.

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